How to turn off Windows 10 keylogger?

How to turn off Windows 10 keylogger?

How to turn off Windows 10 keylogger? I was told that Windows 10 records every keystroke and sends it back to Microsoft. Is this true, and if so, can I disable keylogging on Windows 10?   Disable Windows 10 keylogger: 1. Go to Start Menu > click on the Settings menu. 2. Click on Privacy. 3. under the General section, tweak different privacy settings. 4. For instance, you can toggle the following setting off: Send Microsoft info about how I write to help us improve typing and writing in the future. 5. Also, click go to Speech, inking and typing section to switch off the Stop getting to know me feature. 6. Apart from these, you can also turn off different other privacy invading features. Go to Microphone or Camera to turn these off for the device or for specific apps. You can also explore several more settings in the Privacy section that you may want to check out to see what else you want to switch off. Original text...
Glitter nail polish: The new way to protect your data – News – Gadgets and Tech – The Independent

Glitter nail polish: The new way to protect your data – News – Gadgets and Tech – The Independent

Security experts have come up with a novel way to ensure your laptop or tablet hasn’t been tampered with and your data compromised – glitter nail polish. Physical tampering with devices to steal data, or install malware for monitoring purposes, is becoming an increasing problem, especially when travelling, where border officials can easily confiscate devices for ‘inspection’. Problems with hardware interference and data theft have been particularly reported by business travellers to China. The UK government meanwhile has the right to suck all the data from a device and store it when people enter and leave the country. Many people do fit tamper-proof seals over ports and screws, but these can easily be opened cleanly or replicated in minutes by anyone with minimal training, security researchers Eric Michaud and Ryan Lackey said, while presenting at the Chaos Communication Congress, reports Wired magazine. The pair’s answer – create a seal that cannot be copied. Glitter nail polish is the perfect candidate for making the seal, the pair added, as a completely random pattern is created, unlike with standard paint or a sticker. Once applied, a photo can be taken on a device such as a smartphone that will not leave your side – or can be left at home – to ensure the image has not been tampered with. Taking a second picture once you’ve returned from a trip or become suspicious that your laptop has been meddled with, then running the two through a program that allow the two images to be rapidly switched between, will allow you to spot any differences if the glitter nail polish has been...
Fully patched versions of Firefox, Chrome, IE 11 and Safari exploited at Pwn2Own hacking competition

Fully patched versions of Firefox, Chrome, IE 11 and Safari exploited at Pwn2Own hacking competition

As in years past, the latest patched versions of the most popular web browsers around stood little chance against those competing in the annual Pwn2Own hacking competition. The usual suspects – Apple Safari, Google Chrome, Mozilla Firefox and Microsoft Internet Explorer – all went down during the two-day competition, earning researchers a collective total of $557,500 in prize money. The event, which took place at the CanSecWest conference in Vancouver, was sponsored by the Hewlett-Packard Zero Day Initiative. During the first day, HP awarded $317,500 to researchers that exploited flaws in Adobe Flash, Adobe Reader, Internet Explorer and Firefox. eWeek notes that the first reward, paid to a hacker by the name of ilxu1a, was for an out-of-bounds memory vulnerability in Firefox. It took less than a second to execute which earned him a cool $15,000. Firefox was exploited twice during the event. Daniel Veditz, principal security engineer at Mozilla, said the foundation was on hand during the event to get the bug details from HP. Engineers are already working on a fix back at home, he added, that could be ready as early as today. Another security researcher, JungHoon Lee, managed to demonstrate exploits against Chrome, IE 11 and Safari. As you can imagine, he walked away with quite a bit of money: $75,000 for the Chrome bug, $65,000 for IE and $50,000 for the Safari vulnerability. He also received two bonuses totaling $35,000....
Adult Site Xhamster Hit by ‘Huge’ Malvertising Attack

Adult Site Xhamster Hit by ‘Huge’ Malvertising Attack

Security experts are warning of a new malvertising attack on adult site xhamster which is serving up a recently discovered zero day exploit in Adobe Flash to infect users. Malwarebytes said in a blog post that it had witnessed a 1500% increase in infections from the popular porn site over the past couple of days alone. Unlike most drive-by-downloads of this sort, the attack doesn’t use an exploit kit but merely embeds a landing page and exploit in a rogue ad network, the security firm claimed. The malicious ad can be found on traffichaus.com, launched from an iframe. It takes the user to a simplified landing page hosted by what Malwarebytes believes is a rogue ad network. The Flash Player exploit in question, hosted on this ad network, has a detection rate of 0 out of 57 vendors on Virus Total. In turn it downloads Bedep malware, which is known for loading ad fraud payloads or dropping additional malicious code onto a victim’s machine. The Adobe Flash zero day was discovered last week by researcher Kafeine. However, at the time it was being distributed via the Angler exploit kit. It also dropped Bedep onto victim machines, with the same ad fraud payload. “While malvertising on xhamster is nothing new, this particular campaign is extremely active,” wrote Malwarebytes. “Given that this adult site generates a lot of traffic, the number of infections is going to be huge.” The xhamster site is thought to generate around 500 million visits each month. A Malwarebytes spokesperson warned that IT security teams need to tweak their strategies to counter the growing volume of advanced malware,...
Security Pros Must Better Understand the Human Factor Behind Passwords

Security Pros Must Better Understand the Human Factor Behind Passwords

Passwords are now an everyday part of life, but they are also a pain in the neck for employees. Workers are typically asked to change their passwords every month or so, with each one becoming more complicated than the last. As shown by data gathered from over 300,000 employees, the strongest determinant of whether they will behave securely is the burden they feel it requires. The problem is that, regardless of how easy information security teams can make it, they still need employees to use unique, complex passwords. Data breaches in the last year have demonstrated how easily passwords can be acquired. Attackers often target an employee in a ‘phishing’ attack, getting access to a company’s network and data. With simple multi-factor authentication yet to really take off, passwords will continue to appear in security scenarios for a while yet. Lessons for Information Security Teams The New York Times recently ran a fascinating article, ‘The Secret Life of Passwords’, that described how people choose intimate and often poignant subjects for their passwords. In one way, it is good news that these people are not using their date of birth or ’12345678’ as their password, and it suggests that many have learned how to manage the use of complex passwords. But with passwords so personal and so meaningful, employees are likely re-using them across sites, which today is likely the biggest behavior-related risk with passwords. On top of this, if passwords are so meaningful to their creators, it becomes difficult for infosec teams to persuade employees to change them, and use multiple different passwords on different sites. To name one example, information theory legend Douglas R. Hofstadter has revealed...
World’s Most Advanced Hackers are in Russia and Eastern Europe

World’s Most Advanced Hackers are in Russia and Eastern Europe

As MD for international markets, LogRhythm’s Ross Brewer is well versed in the latest geographical trends and targets. “Germany is a big target at the moment”, he told Infosecurity. “It is a manufacturing country with amazing IP. It’s a country conscious of monitoring its population too much with a focus on employee privacy, and this is not lost on the hacking community.” German IP is therefore a target and tends to end up in Asia, according to Brewer. As an emerging market, the Middle East positioning itself as ‘the destination’ is also a target, Brewer said. “The biggest threat to Europe comes from Eastern countries where the most experienced, most capable hackers are. The most advanced hackers on the planet reside in Russia and Eastern Europe.” Threats from Asia tend to be less stealthy, however, Brewer declared. “So whilst the most obvious threat comes from Asia, the most real threat comes from East Europe.” LogRhythm’s Brewer also flagged the French market as vulnerable, notably “because they buy all their technology from within France, but forget they’re plugged into a global internet which leaves them exposed.” Brewer also addressed Africa. “As technologies become more pervasive and wireless more common in Africa, there will be increased threat activity. At the moment, the African infrastructure is not on the same level as the rest of the world, with power and technology intermittent, but as that increases, so too will the threat”. “Critical infrastructure is the target now, in every country”, Brewer told Infosecurity. The Pervasive Insider Threat Problem A recent survey of 1000 IT professionals, conducted by OnePoll on behalf of LogRhythm,...